Nonfiction - The Starry White

I open the year with a joke. "My name is Mr. White, like the color of my [the students look expectantly toward my skin] walls." Cue enough laughter to sustain the joke next period. But now it's noticeable, the harsh white of the room, a combination of paint and the clinical spray of ceiling bulbs. We are as illuminated and shadowless as models in a photoshoot, sans forgiveness.

There is one window: a square portal on the door. When I sit at my desk, I can see "Starry Night" through it, one of the Van Gogh prints distributed through the school. There's an apocryphal story of how he painted that landscape in a sanatorium. Unable to see the city from his window, he imagined it in his hand. It gets me wishing they'd let us paint our madness on the canvas of our walls. Why let filth color us? Scuffs, gum, "fuck school" in blue pen, a poster of an iguana saying "character is who you are when no one is watching." Let swirling blacks, blues, and yellows, stars and cities and black towers, roil down the hall, drowning the disquiet and sterility of asepsis.